Monthly Archives: March 2015

Certified Farmers’ Market Permits: Wine Tastings Included

California winegrowers holding a Type 02 license have been able to sell their wine at farmers’ markets under a special permit (Certified Farmers’ Market Sales Permit) for some time. For a relatively nominal fee, now $50, a licensed winegrower may sell wine at a certified farmers’ market so long as the wine is (a) “produced entirely from grapes or other agricultural products grown by the winegrower” and (b) bottled by the winegrower. The permit is good for an entire year, but the winegrower may only sell wine one day a week at any given farmers’ market. A separate license is required for each certified farmers’ market at which the winegrower’s product is to be sold, but there is no limit on the number of licenses that may be held.

Annual sales for wine sold under all certified farmers’ market sales permits held by any one winegrower are limited to 5,000 gallons, and are to be reported to the ABC.

As of July 2014, the ABC also allows instructional tasting events to be held at certified farmers’ markets under this license, “subject to the authorization and managerial control” of the particular farmers’ market operator. Restrictions on instructional tasting events are as follows: (1) the event area must be separated from the rest of the market by some type of physical barrier (chain, rope, wall), with only one licensee conducting the event; (2) consumers may not leave the instructional tasting area with an open container; and (3) tastings are limited to 3 ounces per person per day.

Winegrowers undoubtedly welcome this expansion of their rights under this particular license, as it allows them to provide their potential consumers with the full farmers’ market experience of sampling the product prior to purchase.

Interestingly, as of January 1, 2015 licensed beer manufacturers are also allowed to sell their products at certified farmers’ markets, but the ABC restrictions differ from those applicable to licensed winegrowers. Most notably, tastings are not permitted, and the licensee can only sell at farmers’ markets located in the same county or an immediately adjacent county to that in which the beer manufacturer is located.


Placer County Considering Amending Winery Ordinance

Wine regulations can get complicated. Federal and state regulations must be followed, but one must also be aware that mandatory local ordinances can vary from county to county and city to city, adding further hurdles to the success of winemakers and wineries. Localized winery ordinances often regulate the size of tasting rooms, the number of events allowed, and other activities. One such ordinance affecting wineries that host events in Placer County is causing a stir.

As it currently exists, Placer County’s Ordinance 17.56.330 of the Planning and Zoning ordinances, adopted in 2008, is designed to “provide for the orderly development of wineries… encourage the economic development of the local agricultural industry, provide for the sampling and sales of value-added products, and protect the agricultural character and long-term agricultural production of agricultural lands.”  It includes provisions that keep special events and crowds to a minimum. All wineries are required to have a permit for up to six promotional events per year. Promotional events are limited to those that are related to producing wine at the facility, i.e. barrel tastings or relase parties of the host winery’s wines.

Recently, the Placer County Vintner’s Association has expressed concern that the ordinance is too restrictive, and has requested from the Planning Commission changes that would allow more leeway in holding larger and more diverse events.  According to the Association (and a County staff report on the issue), the current ordinance is more restrictive than the ordinances in neighboring Sacramento and Amador counties, and is the only ordinance in these three counties that requires promotional events to be specifically related to promoting the winery or its products. The Association’s goal is to have the ordinance amended to define promotional events more broadly to include private functions such as fundraisers and weddings, and to allow wineries to have more than six promotional events throughout the year. In addition, the Association would have any event with less than 75 people present labeled a “routine activity,” which would need no special permit. The Association argues that the proposed amendment will “help support the 20 wineries located on the Placer County Wine Trail, create local jobs, provide tax revenue to the city and county and keep our landscapes beautiful.”

Not everyone is on board with the potential changes. Some local residents fear that additional events will cause more traffic, which can be especially scary on Placer County’s winding country roads. This fear increases with the idea that people will be consuming wine at the events.  Increased traffic also means increased road maintenance, and some residents are not interested in footing that bill. Increased noise from events is also a factor that the opposition wants considered. Marilyn Jasper, who represents the Sierra Club and Public Interest Coalition, said that current protections safeguard against “de facto conversion (of farmlands) to commercial uses,” and opposes the proposed amendments.

At the end of February, the Planning Commission decided to send the proposed amendments to municipal advisory councils for comments before revisiting the issue later in 2015. We will be looking out for final word later in the year.


Craft Beverages: Where Can Wine Fit In?

It’s no secret that the craft beverage industry is booming. In the past few years, hundreds of craft breweries have opened across the state, with over 40 now in the Sacramento region alone. The liquor industry is also getting on board, with specialty flavors, blends, and other creative concoctions designed to woo the growing number of consumers who have expressed a desire for smaller, more artistic beverages. The craft industry has gotten so popular that one beer industry giant paid millions of dollars to address the issue head-on in a Super Bowl ad. With all of the hype (and, naturally, dollars) involved with “craft,” why hasn’t wine joined the movement?

On January 29, 2015, I attended a seminar titled, “Understand the Marketing of ‘Craft’ and the Opportunities for the Wine Industry” at the Unified Symposium. The panel consisted of J.E. Paino, general manager of Ruhstaller Brewery in Sacramento (you may have seen their hops being grown on the side of Highway 80 in Dixon), Kellie Shevlin of the Craft Beverage Expo (Suzanne and I will be exhibitors this year), Adam Johnson from the Kentucky Bourbon Trail, and Cindy Molchany of Craft Beverage Media. The first point that was made involved the definition of craft itself– everyone on the panel agreed that there was no set definition (or a need for a set definition), but that authenticity, lack of pretentiousness, and transparency about methodology were foundations.

The panel discussed some of the challenges that wine faces in fitting in to the “craft” scene, the first being that wine is perceived as a very traditional, stuffy, established beverage. This is contrary to the modern, younger image often marketed in the craft world. Being creative with wine also comes with some regulatory hurdles. Although ingredient regulations also exist in the beer and liquor worlds, wine regulations are the most stringent. A list of allowable and prohibited additives to wine can be found here. As one frustrated commenter at the panel stated, “Wine isn’t like beer. I can’t just dump a bunch of honey and vanilla into my wine and call it craft!”

The panel offered some alternative methods to attract craft consumers, including the finishing of wine, and advertising and marketing strategies. First, the idea of using alternative barrels was presented. For example, used bourbon or whiskey barrels can create a unique flavor profile to wine, and offer the consumer something unexpected. In addition, the panel suggested that, contrary to the traditional, customary, ahem, boring(!), labels that we’re used to see plastered on wine bottles, labeling can be a little bit more fun and creative. If the winemaker is also an artist, for example, have them render an original work for the label, or, if there is a special method that the winemaker uses, showcase that on the label! If you have a tasting room, consider adding a tour, or other special service aimed at giving the consumer a more personal experience with your wine. When consumers are able to experience the wine making process from the soil to the glass, the transparency of the process, as well as the consumer’s association of your product with the craft of the industry, increases.

If you’re in the wine business, you know that wine making is certainly a craft, in addition to being a labor of love. It’s time that the industry showcase this artistry to consumers.