Craft Beverages: Where Can Wine Fit In?

It’s no secret that the craft beverage industry is booming. In the past few years, hundreds of craft breweries have opened across the state, with over 40 now in the Sacramento region alone. The liquor industry is also getting on board, with specialty flavors, blends, and other creative concoctions designed to woo the growing number of consumers who have expressed a desire for smaller, more artistic beverages. The craft industry has gotten so popular that one beer industry giant paid millions of dollars to address the issue head-on in a Super Bowl ad. With all of the hype (and, naturally, dollars) involved with “craft,” why hasn’t wine joined the movement?

On January 29, 2015, I attended a seminar titled, “Understand the Marketing of ‘Craft’ and the Opportunities for the Wine Industry” at the Unified Symposium. The panel consisted of J.E. Paino, general manager of Ruhstaller Brewery in Sacramento (you may have seen their hops being grown on the side of Highway 80 in Dixon), Kellie Shevlin of the Craft Beverage Expo (Suzanne and I will be exhibitors this year), Adam Johnson from the Kentucky Bourbon Trail, and Cindy Molchany of Craft Beverage Media. The first point that was made involved the definition of craft itself– everyone on the panel agreed that there was no set definition (or a need for a set definition), but that authenticity, lack of pretentiousness, and transparency about methodology were foundations.

The panel discussed some of the challenges that wine faces in fitting in to the “craft” scene, the first being that wine is perceived as a very traditional, stuffy, established beverage. This is contrary to the modern, younger image often marketed in the craft world. Being creative with wine also comes with some regulatory hurdles. Although ingredient regulations also exist in the beer and liquor worlds, wine regulations are the most stringent. A list of allowable and prohibited additives to wine can be found here. As one frustrated commenter at the panel stated, “Wine isn’t like beer. I can’t just dump a bunch of honey and vanilla into my wine and call it craft!”

The panel offered some alternative methods to attract craft consumers, including the finishing of wine, and advertising and marketing strategies. First, the idea of using alternative barrels was presented. For example, used bourbon or whiskey barrels can create a unique flavor profile to wine, and offer the consumer something unexpected. In addition, the panel suggested that, contrary to the traditional, customary, ahem, boring(!), labels that we’re used to see plastered on wine bottles, labeling can be a little bit more fun and creative. If the winemaker is also an artist, for example, have them render an original work for the label, or, if there is a special method that the winemaker uses, showcase that on the label! If you have a tasting room, consider adding a tour, or other special service aimed at giving the consumer a more personal experience with your wine. When consumers are able to experience the wine making process from the soil to the glass, the transparency of the process, as well as the consumer’s association of your product with the craft of the industry, increases.

If you’re in the wine business, you know that wine making is certainly a craft, in addition to being a labor of love. It’s time that the industry showcase this artistry to consumers.

 


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