Monthly Archives: April 2015

Going Green: Labeling Organic Wine

Labeling of wine is subject to regulation by the TTB, and requires a certificate of label approval (COLA). Basic information that must be included on all labels include the brand name, class or type of wine, alcohol content, appellation, the bottler’s name and address, contents by volume, a sulfite declaration, and the government health warning. Previously, Uncorked ran a post about font and sizing requirements, accessible here.

If you want include “organic” claims on your label, you must satisfy USDA organic regulations for production and handling of your wine. Those requirements are beyond the scope of this post, but suffice it to say they are extensive. And, the type of “organic” claims you can make on your label are dependent upon a few key factors.

To label your wine “Organic” and to use the USDA Organic seal on your label, your wine-making operations must be overseen by a third-party accredited certifying agent (ACA) to ensure compliance with organic production and handling requirements. The yeast used in your wine, and all agricultural ingredients (i.e., grapes) must be certified organic, with the exception of those ingredients on the National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances, information about which can be found here. Non-agricultural ingredients must be on the National List, and are limited to a certain percentage of the total product. Finally, only naturally occurring sulfites are allowed in wines with an “Organic” label. If you want to include a statement on the label that your wine contains only naturally occurring sulfites, you will need a lab analysis to back that up.

Wines with added sulfites (up to 100 ppm of sulfur dioxide) may not be labeled “Organic” or use the USDA Organic seal, but they may be labeled as “Made with Organic Grapes.” Only the grapes must be certified organic, the remaining agricultural ingredients need not be.

Labels for both “Organic” and “Made with Organic Grapes” must include the name of the certifier/ACA: “Certified organic by ***.”

If your wine doesn’t meet the criteria for “Organic” or “Made with Organic Grapes” labeling, you may still be able to list certain  ingredients as organic, but will have to submit proof of certification for each ingredient with your COLA application.

Setting your wine apart from the crowd with an organic label is great marketing. Just make sure you are current on USDA and TTB regulations before you send those labels to print!


Best Practices in Winery Tasting Rooms

If you have a tasting room, you know that following the letter of the law is the best way to stay under the radar (and off the naughty list) of the ABC. Violations, including serving minors or obviously intoxicated patrons, can have serious consequences, including jail time, criminal fines, administrative penalties, and civil liability. And you, as the owner, will always be held accountable for the actions of your employees, even if you were not present when a violation occurred. While insurance can cover general business liability, it never covers gross negligence, which is why it is so important to make sure that you and your team are trained in the best practices to avoid violations. In addition to or as a part of your employee training and handbook, here are a few things to keep in mind:

Do all of your employees know where your license is? The ABC requires you not only to be validly licensed, but to have your license posted. Every employee of your tasting room must know where that license is, and be ready to point it out to anyone who asks for it. If your business cannot produce a license, then the person serving alcohol is subject to arrest, and you as the owner are subject to an administrative penalty. In reality, the ABC is not likely to make an arrest until they have sufficient reason to believe that no valid license exists, but, even with a valid license, the posting is required, and the consequences are potentially severe.

Do your employees know where people can and cannot consume alcohol on your premises? All permanent ABC licensees have submitted defined spaces for alcohol consumption to the ABC. Consumption of alcohol outside that defined space is a violation. For this reason, you should make sure that all of your employees know and enforce these limits. If your defined space does not include your parking lot, for example, then it is up to you and your employees to ensure that people are not walking out of the permitted area with a glass of wine. Even a bus stop on a public sidewalk in front of your tasting room may be your responsibility. It is important to remember that consumption outside the allowed boundaries, even if the alcohol was not provided by you, is a violation, and you can be cited. That means no tailgaters.

Do your employees follow a policy of checking identification? Serving alcohol to minors is the most common ABC violation. As a classy tasting room owner, the idea of teenagers trying to crash your business to get a sip of wine might sound absurd, but the truth is that it happens every day. Each employee should be required to check the identification of anyone who appears to be under 35 years old. You may want to take this a step further and require that all customer identification be checked before they can taste. Employees should be trained to look for six items in order to validate an ID: 1) the ID must be issued by the government; 2) name of ID owner; 3) date of birth corresponding to an age of 21; 4) description matching the person presenting the ID; 5) photograph matching the person presenting the ID; and 6) the ID must not be expired.

Do your employees know when to cut someone off? It is an ABC violation to serve alcohol to someone who is obviously intoxicated. For ABC’s purposes, “obviously intoxicated” has nothing to do with a 0.08% blood alcohol level, and has much more to do with common sense. While this description leaves some wiggle room, it is best to have in place policies so that you and your employees never have to worry about infringing. Train your employees to observe your customers. If someone appears to have had one too many, make sure that your employees have a game plan. For example, tell your employees to let another coworker or manager know about the customer so that there is backup. Employees should be courteous to the customer, and explain that the ABC won’t let the employee serve any more drinks. If the customer is rude or belligerent, the employee should be encouraged to contact authorities. The employee should never bargain with the customer or back down. If possible, the employee should provide water and arrange for a ride for the customer. Any incident where a customer is cut off or has their drink taken away should be documented.

Remember, nothing prohibits you from doing more than is required by the ABC. In order to avoid violations and keep the ABC at bay, the best tasting room policies and practices go above and beyond the compulsory conditions.