Going Green: Labeling Organic Wine

Labeling of wine is subject to regulation by the TTB, and requires a certificate of label approval (COLA). Basic information that must be included on all labels include the brand name, class or type of wine, alcohol content, appellation, the bottler’s name and address, contents by volume, a sulfite declaration, and the government health warning. Previously, Uncorked ran a post about font and sizing requirements, accessible here.

If you want include “organic” claims on your label, you must satisfy USDA organic regulations for production and handling of your wine. Those requirements are beyond the scope of this post, but suffice it to say they are extensive. And, the type of “organic” claims you can make on your label are dependent upon a few key factors.

To label your wine “Organic” and to use the USDA Organic seal on your label, your wine-making operations must be overseen by a third-party accredited certifying agent (ACA) to ensure compliance with organic production and handling requirements. The yeast used in your wine, and all agricultural ingredients (i.e., grapes) must be certified organic, with the exception of those ingredients on the National List of Allowed and Prohibited Substances, information about which can be found here. Non-agricultural ingredients must be on the National List, and are limited to a certain percentage of the total product. Finally, only naturally occurring sulfites are allowed in wines with an “Organic” label. If you want to include a statement on the label that your wine contains only naturally occurring sulfites, you will need a lab analysis to back that up.

Wines with added sulfites (up to 100 ppm of sulfur dioxide) may not be labeled “Organic” or use the USDA Organic seal, but they may be labeled as “Made with Organic Grapes.” Only the grapes must be certified organic, the remaining agricultural ingredients need not be.

Labels for both “Organic” and “Made with Organic Grapes” must include the name of the certifier/ACA: “Certified organic by ***.”

If your wine doesn’t meet the criteria for “Organic” or “Made with Organic Grapes” labeling, you may still be able to list certain  ingredients as organic, but will have to submit proof of certification for each ingredient with your COLA application.

Setting your wine apart from the crowd with an organic label is great marketing. Just make sure you are current on USDA and TTB regulations before you send those labels to print!


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: